Timothée Stroebel


Timothée Stroebel Le Vin Tranquille '16 |Coteaux Champenois (Still Wine) |2016

Timothée Stroebel

Timothée Stroebel Le Vin Tranquille '16

Coteaux Champenois (Still Wine) 2016

$144.95

- Expressive and complex red wine made with pinot meunier 

- Organically made using small oak barrels

- Pair with rare roast beef, crispy duck or an assortment of cheese

"Nose to die for with freshly crushed grape juice, complex notes of toast + honey, sweet spice. The initial flavours are of blackberry conserve with red berries coming through. The tannins as you would expect from this type of wine are dry and heightened with some raspberry tang.

Given some time in the glass the flavours open up to creamed blueberry and the tannins soften giving way to a light-to-medium body. This is a delightful Coteaux champenois and a food wine for sure" - Nesh Simic 

Tasting note: Dense, savoury, velvety. Liquid Charisma! Grippy and concentrated and 'cool climate-lush'. Herbal forest floor-chalky cranberry-spiced red currant-licorice raspberry-pain d'epice, hints of earth and iron and spice and everything nice. Somewhere between Fleurie, Saint Joseph and Barolo. 93 points. Paired w/truffle brie - Champagne Spy

What is a Coteaux Champenois?

Well, there are four categories of champagne, which are;

- Clear champagne - sparkling which is the most common

- Rosé champagne - sparkling that is blended or macerated

- Coteaux Champenois - Still red, white and Rosé (as in Rosé de Riceys) 

- Ratafia de Champagne - a still, sweet wine, similar to Port

We have chosen the Coteaux Champenois from Timothee as this wine is one of the better examples of this style if you have never had it before.

Champagne, despite its lofty reputation, has borne the brunt of chemical farming, perhaps more so than any other French wine region. It’s thanks to an increasing handful of growers like Timothée that the soils here are beginning to slowly recover from decades of chemical abuse. They are leading the way, and others are beginning to follow, a little like a positive version of a vinous Pied Piper. The ecosystem doesn’t die; instead it strengthens and flourishes.⁣ Timothée achieved his organic certification in 2014 after over a decade's work to regenerate his soils. He works almost without machines, instead working his soils by horse and plough with his own two horses, Bijou and Quina. All his vineyard work is carried out with the goal of promoting soil health; in order to boost the vineyards’ ecosystem and attract insects and birds.

About the House

Champagne, despite its lofty reputation, has borne the brunt of chemical farming, perhaps more so than any other French wine region. It’s thanks to an increasing handful of growers like Timothée that the soils here are beginning to slowly recover from decades of chemical abuse. They are leading the way, and others are beginning to follow, a little like a positive version of a vinous Pied Piper. The ecosystem doesn’t die; instead it strengthens and flourishes.⁣ Timothée achieved his organic certification in 2014 after over a decade's work to regenerate his soils. He works almost without machines, instead working his soils by horse and plough with his own two horses, Bijou and Quina. All his vineyard work is carried out with the goal of promoting soil health; in order to boost the vineyards’ ecosystem and attract insects and birds.

Descriptors & Texture


Pinot Meunier Dominant

Winemaking


Barrel-maturation Still Red Wine

Earth


Mineral

Red Fruits


Raspberry Cranberry Blackberry

Herbs & Spices


Cooking Spice Spice