Pierre Gerbais


Pierre Gerbais L'Originale Extra Brut |Blanc de Blancs |2014

Pierre Gerbais

Pierre Gerbais L'Originale Extra Brut

Blanc de Blancs 2014

$134.95

- A talented young 4th generation grower from the Côte des Bar

- Discover one of champagne's forgotten varieties - Pinot blanc

- Pair with Prawn Thai Green Curry - Mild and not spicy

A champagne made of pure pinot blanc is rare enough, but a pinot blanc champagne made from old vines is almost unheard of. Gerbais’s L’Originale comes from two pinot blanc parcels in Celles-sur-Ource—one 60 years old and the other 80 years old—both of which face south.

Despite this, the notable characteristic here is not ripeness, but structure: the fragrant notes of kiwi, calamansi, green pear and lime are rich in texture but surprisingly delicate in body, and they’re pinned down by fresh, lively acidity, energizing and elongating the aromas on the palate.

It’s a subtle, complex wine, veering towards exotic fruit yet also hinting at sweet herbs and spice, and it continues to gain detail and expression as it opens up in the glass. Truly a wine that lives up to its name. Peter Liem.

The Gerbais family has been growing vines in Celles-sur-Ource for 8 generations, and making wine since 1930. After the Second World War, Pierre Gerbais began investing heavily in vineyard land: while he started with just 0.4 hectares of vines, the domaine has grown to nearly 18 hectares today. His son Pascal is now at the helm of the estate, and since 2009, Pascal’s son Aurélien has been working together with the family as well.

Responsible agriculture is at the heart of the Gerbais philosophy, and since 1996, the estate has been a member of Ampelos, an organisation that controls and certifies sustainable viticulture. Ampelos allows no chemical fertilisers, herbicides or insecticides, and Gerbais grows cover crops where appropriate, ploughing the vineyards regularly as well.

Gerbais owns both a traditional vertical press and a pneumatic one, and while it’s necessary to have multiple presses for an estate of this size, he notes that the characters of the two are different. “The extraction in the traditional press is more precise, since it takes a longer time,” he says. “It’s better for certain terroirs.” All of the wines are fermented in tank, “for precision, and to respect the terroir,” says Gerbais, although he has begun using some demi-muids (600 litre capacity Barrels) for ageing. All of the wines go through malo-lactic fermentation, and they are bottled without fining or filtration.

Peter Liem – TheChampagneGuide.net

Overall, great style of wine, needs food, mostly likely something with flavours to match. I like the idea of roast hapuka with crispy potatoes and capers. 

About the house

The Gerbais family has been growing vines in Celles-sur-Ource for 8 generations, and making wine since 1930. After the Second World War, Pierre Gerbais began investing heavily in vineyard land: while he started with just 0.4 hectares of vines, the domaine has grown to nearly 18 hectares today. His son Pascal is now at the helm of the estate, and since 2009, Pascal’s son Aurélien has been working together with the family as well.

Responsible agriculture is at the heart of the Gerbais philosophy, and since 1996, the estate has been a member of Ampelos, an organisation that controls and certifies sustainable viticulture. Ampelos allows no chemical fertilisers, herbicides or insecticides, and Gerbais grows cover crops where appropriate, ploughing the vineyards regularly as well.

Gerbais owns both a traditional vertical press and a pneumatic one, and while it’s necessary to have multiple presses for an estate of this size, he notes that the characters of the two are different. “The extraction in the traditional press is more precise, since it takes a longer time,” he says. “It’s better for certain terroirs.” All of the wines are fermented in tank, “for precision, and to respect the terroir,” says Gerbais, although he has begun using some demi-muids (600 litre capacity Barrels) for ageing. All of the wines go through malo-lactic fermentation, and they are bottled without fining or filtration.

Peter Liem – TheChampagneGuide.net

Food suggestion

Overall, great style of wine, needs food, mostly likely something with flavours to match. I like the idea of roast hapuka with crispy potatoes and capers. 

Descriptors & Texture


Chewy Savoury Stone Briny

Winemaking


Extra Brut Aged 3 Years on Lees Certified Ampelos

Foods


Honey

Orchard Fruit


Pear

Nut


Almond